The Three Levels of Leadership – Scouller Leadership Blog

Shared Accountability

Last year, I was coaching the President of a large European business.  The subject of “accountability” arose.  She remarked that, “Shared accountability is no accountability.”

In my CEO days, I would have agreed with her.  Like most corporate men, I assumed that one person in the team must hold accountability for results on behalf of the business.  Eleven years on, I hold a different view. Continue reading →

The Language of Change (part 4)

Post 3 of 4 in a series of articles on the subject of leading large-scale change in organisations (part 4).

The first post looked at the power and dangers of metaphors in leading change and suggested replacing the “burning platform” with the idea of a “High Noon moment”.  The second post discussed the dangers of underestimating how long it takes people to change and what you can do about it.  This post – which is appearing in four parts (this is the fourth) – continues examining how leaders can frame their change language to best effect.

In The Language of Change part 1 we looked at the confirmation bias, critiqued the usual approach to change communication and introduced a new three-step process:

  1. Get your audience’s urgent attention
  2. Stimulate desire for a new future
  3. Then and only then… appeal to the intellect

In The Language of Change part 2, I offered practical tips on how to get your change audience’s urgent attention.  In part 3, I offered advice on how to stimulate desire for the new future (the change idea).  In this final part 4, I suggest ways of appealing to the intellect to make sure second thoughts don’t creep in and sabotage the will to change.  Again, this will be in bullet-point form. Continue reading →

The Language of Change (part 3)

Post 3 of 4 in a series of articles on the subject of leading large-scale change in organisations (part 3).

The first post looked at the power and dangers of metaphors in leading change and suggested replacing the “burning platform” with the idea of a “High Noon moment”.  The second post discussed the dangers of underestimating how long it takes people to change and what you can do about it.  This post – which is appearing in four parts (this is the third) – continues examining how leaders can frame their change language to best effect.

In The Language of Change part 1 we looked at the confirmation bias, critiqued the usual approach to change communication and introduced a new three-step process:

  1. Get your audience’s urgent attention
  2. Stimulate desire for a new future
  3. Then and only then… appeal to the intellect

In The Language of Change part 2, I offered practical tips on how to get your change audience’s urgent attention.  In this part 3, I offer advice on how to stimulate desire for the new future (the change idea).  Again, this will be in bullet-point form. Continue reading →

The Language of Change (part 2)

Post 3 of 4 in a series of articles on the subject of leading large-scale change in organisations (part 2).

The first post looked at the power and dangers of metaphors in leading change and suggested replacing the “burning platform” with the idea of a “High Noon moment”.  The second post discussed the dangers of underestimating how long it takes people to change and what you can do about it.  This post – which is appearing in four parts (this is the second) – continues examining how leaders can frame their change language to best effect.

In the previous post (Leading Change part 1) we looked at the confirmation bias, critiqued the usual approach to change communication and introduced a new three-step process:

  1. Get your audience’s urgent attention
  2. Stimulate desire for a new future
  3. Then and only then… appeal to the intellect

This post zeroes in on step #1 and offers practical tips in bullet-point format on how to get your change audience’s urgent attention. Continue reading →

The Language of Change (part 1)

Post 3 of 4 in a series of articles on the subject of leading large-scale change in organisations (part 1).

The first post looked at the power and dangers of metaphors in leading change and suggested replacing the “burning platform” with the idea of a “High Noon moment”.  The second post discussed the dangers of underestimating how long it takes people to change and what you can do about it.  This post – which I’ll spread over four days – will suggest how leaders can frame their change language to best effect. Continue reading →

Why Do Organisational Change Initiatives Overrun?

Post 2 of 4 in a series of articles on the subject of leading large-scale change in organisations.

The first post looked at the power and dangers of metaphors in leading change and suggested replacing the “burning platform” with the idea of a “High Noon moment”.  This post looks at the dangers of underestimating how long it takes people to change and what you can do about it. Continue reading →

Are We Serious About Growing Leaders?

In industry, do we take the challenge of growing future leaders seriously?  I don’t think we do and here’s why… Continue reading →

Do We Always Need Leadership?

Does a group or a firm always need leadership?  The surprising answer is no and this short article explains why. Continue reading →

From “Burning Platform” to “High Noon”

Post 1 of 4 in a series of articles on the subject of leading large-scale change in organisations.

We start by looking at the power and dangers of metaphors in leading change.  Metaphors help in connecting with and influencing others because they distil the message in a vivid memorable way.  But they can backfire. Let’s consider the example of the “burning platform”. Continue reading →

Leadership & The Act of Will: Part 5

This is the last in a series of five blog articles on the act of will (to return to the first in the series click here).

The act of will is the art of figuring out what to do and getting it done.  All leaders, ultimately, have to get things done and this is why it’s so helpful for them to understand that the act of will is a process with six stages. Continue reading →

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